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2020XP4
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Salt, the air off the ocean (if you live close) is very corrosive. I use my machine to plow snow. I run down the road to my mom's too. Just the salt from the road started corroding bolt heads and unprotected metal. I plowed 3 times this year.

Went to Daytona Beach bike week 2011. Parked my Softail in the parking lot at the beach side condo. The salt spray immediately turned my polished aluminum rocker boxes to a dull grey. Bolt heads rusted before we got loaded to leave. Couldn't pay me to live near the ocean...
 

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I know some of the cities up North use beet juice from sugar beets. Highly corrosive also.
 

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2019 G$ EPS, white
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I cant reasonably believe ours is beach related but possible. We just didnt ride alot there. Just going to keep worst areas sprayed down with something to minimize further rusting, if i find a good protectant
 

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I cant reasonably believe ours is beach related but possible. We just didnt ride alot there. Just going to keep worst areas sprayed down with something to minimize further rusting, if i find a good protectant
Look into fluid film... Used it this past year on my wifes traverse. I'm 100% sold on it. If you get fluid film, buy it in the aresol cans or buy the special sprayer for it too. It's like butterscotch pudding in the gallon cans...

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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With that much surface rust already started you are going to want to treat those areas with a Rust Converter product, it will neutralize the current rust and you can then prime and paint directly over it. A product like fluid film will prevent rust but not neutralize what has already started.
 

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2016 Polaris General Deluxe, 10% OEM
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In the second picture from the top, we're looking at the inner CV Joint with the axle shaft pulled out. The large diameter piece is the XV Joint housing which has a splined shaft that goes into the differential Output hub. Looking into th housing you see the sort of star shaped piece with a larger diameter ring around it. That is the actual CV Joint that articulates and allows for axle articulation in all planes. The CV Joint balls are like the balls in a bearing. Mounted between the star looking piece and the round ring. Just in case some of you haven't seen the inside of one.
 

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2016 Polaris General Deluxe, 10% OEM
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5,022 Posts
Since the CV Joint housing and shaft (cup?) are stuck in the Output hubs.
Your only option may be to use a Sawzall or large diameter cut off wheel to cut the splines shaft off the end of the CV-Joint housing.
If nothing else you can use a brass drift and drive the cut off shaft into the diff. You can then use a larger diameter brass drift to go through the now empty Output hub and drive the other axle out without damage.

You can use a wire wheel on a grinder to clean all the corrosion products off the splines of the undamaged axle.
I have used a small triangle file to clean the splines on the inside of the Output hubs.
Replace all three seals. Axles and Pinion.
Once all us clean, put 10 Oz of a solvent in the diff. "Pick it up and shake it all around". Drain the solvent and put the plugs in finger tight.

I use nickel based anti-seize from my steam turbine overhaul mgmt days. C5A was the basic, it's copper based and not rated for much temperature and it will wash out. You can get nickel based at about any parts store. It's rated for 1000F and doesn't wash with water. Get a little on your hands and you'll find out quickly.
I use solder Flux brushes to coat the inner splines with anti-seize and the exterior splines too!
Reassemble the diff and put it back in the chassis, bolt in place.
Install the axles, reassemble the outer ends with fresh anti-seize on splines. Fill with Demand Drive fluid and go ride!
 
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