Polaris General Forum banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, parked my 19 General 1000 deluxe in my basement in Nov. running great, only has 800 miles on it. Just went down to move it to the garage and its trying to start and dies, sounds like only firing on one cylinder. Could it be a spark plug failure or what do you think. Fuel pumps sounds ok when i turn the key on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,611 Posts
If it takes 8 or more times to get the machine to stay running...I've got the same problem.

I've heard it was need to run "winterized fuel" That helped last year, but not this Fall. Low temps of 50 degrees and finally had to raise the bed, open the air cleaner box and give it a squirt of starting fluid.

Hopefully someone will jump in and give us some help.

Pirate
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
Doesn't seem like three months would be time for the fuel to go bad. Vapor pressure of the fuel plays a part and refineries have different blends for different times of the year and geographic location. If you had a low vapor pressure fuel, more of a summer blend, then it could give you difficulties in starting it in the cold weather. The winter blend has a higher vapor pressure. Ask me how I know this, I've been refining crude for 20 years now. It could also be low pressure on the fuel pump or even dirty injectors. What part of the country do you live in and at what altitude?
You might want to pull your spark plugs out and give them a look over and make sure everything there looks good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
If it takes 8 or more times to get the machine to stay running...I've got the same problem.

I've heard it was need to run "winterized fuel" That helped last year, but not this Fall. Low temps of 50 degrees and finally had to raise the bed, open the air cleaner box and give it a squirt of starting fluid.

Hopefully someone will jump in and give us some help.

Pirate
Money will start
If it takes 8 or more times to get the machine to stay running...I've got the same problem.

I've heard it was need to run "winterized fuel" That helped last year, but not this Fall. Low temps of 50 degrees and finally had to raise the bed, open the air cleaner box and give it a squirt of starting fluid.

Hopefully someone will jump in and give us some help.

Pirate
I run seafoam in every ounce of fuel I run and swear by it. I'm going to pick up a set of new plugs tomorrow and will post how it works.
Doesn't seem like three months would be time for the fuel to go bad. Vapor pressure of the fuel plays a part and refineries have different blends for different times of the year and geographic location. If you had a low vapor pressure fuel, more of a summer blend, then it could give you difficulties in starting it in the cold weather. The winter blend has a higher vapor pressure. Ask me how I know this, I've been refining crude for 20 years now. It could also be low pressure on the fuel pump or even dirty injectors. What part of the country do you live in and at what altitude?
You might want to pull your spark plugs out and give them a look over and make sure everything there looks good.
I'm in New Hampshire, using the same fuel I've used for45 years in my machines so i dont think fuel is the problem but i will keep that in mind if plugs or electrical problem doesnt work. Thanks for your replies
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
Money will start

I run seafoam in every ounce of fuel I run and swear by it. I'm going to pick up a set of new plugs tomorrow and will post how it works.

I'm in New Hampshire, using the same fuel I've used for45 years in my machines so i dont think fuel is the problem but i will keep that in mind if plugs or electrical problem doesnt work. Thanks for your replies
I believe in seafoam also, sounds like fuel quality isn't the issue. Do you have a means to check the fuel pressure at the rail?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I believe in seafoam also, sounds like fuel quality isn't the issue. Do you have a means to check the fuel pressure at the rail?
No but I think I will have to u tube how to check it. Funny that it seems to try and run on one cylinder though, if I didnt have proper pressure wouldn't it start up on both cylinders and die when I tried to increase throttle.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
No but I think I will have to u tube how to check it. Funny that it seems to try and run on one cylinder though, if I didnt have proper pressure wouldn't it start up on both cylinders and die when I tried to increase throttle.
It probably would depend on how much pressure is building up. It could just have enough to hit the first cylinder in line. That might be a good starting point. You might want to research some previous threads, there is one that talks about testing the pressure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,611 Posts
Waaalll...I've tested my fuel pressure and its a steady 58 psi. So that's not it. I replaced the plugs in the Fall, so I don't think that's it. I'm using the same plugs as the machine came with, so I don't think that's it.

Front door is at 5640 ft elevation. Problem started in Lake City, CO at 8661 ft elevation. In Nov 2019 the problem showed up for the first time in Moab at 4026 ft elevation.

Made contact with Terry Gilomen for help. Told me to run as much gas out of the machine as I could, then fill it with "Winterized" gas. Shell station there advertised they had it. Problem
disappeared. So that may we be the problem now...but how on earth does one know if that's what their buying? No signs on any of the gas pumps at stations around home...
Terry did tell me that Winterized fuel isn't a good idea in the Summer, it evaporates quickly. Can someone validate that?

Still learning...

Pirate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,030 Posts
Try to run straight gas also. We can't get it here every station here has ethanol blend. Hate that stuff and it is junk!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
Here at my refinery we make many blends of gasoline from 5 different blending stocks. We ship to Albuquerque with 3 blends that are different that the ones we use local and different that the ones we ship to Tucson and Phoenix. And these blends vary with the season one each location. One of the stocks is a very high vapor pressure that is close to butane. The amounts of each blending stock vary on what octane and vapor pressure the blend spec is. Usually when you buy gas close to home, the blend is perfect for your conditions. When you get into trouble is bringing or taking gas to/from different locations. So if you are going somewhere that is drastically different from where you live(temperature and elevation) then it's best to take your machine near empty and fill up there and try to run it to empty before you bring it home.

With too high of vapor pressure you get vapor locking and too low you get lack of ignition. Some of the blend stocks we use range from 104 octane to 70 octane. When we fill up a blend tank, a program decides how much of each of these five streams go into the tank. I hope this makes sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Update: spark plugs both firing, battery posts cleaned and battery at 12.75 V. I have to buy a fuel rail pressure gauge to test fuel pressure but you can here pump come on and shut off when you turn key on and if you press in on rail pressure nipple fuel is under good pressure, swapped relays around. Problem the same! if i don't touch the throttle the engine will idle on what sounds like one cylinder but if you touch the gas peddle it will stall. Is there a way to test the EFI at the plugs on the air intake rubber boots next to the fuel rail?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Hey guys, grasping at straws here. Does anyone know what and were the "MAP"? sensors are and what they do and if I can test them myself as I heard that may be my problem. Thanks for all the replies, I appreciate the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,030 Posts
Here is a pic of what it looks like.
When standing on drivers side, look at your fuel injectors, it is to the right of them, right on top.

68527
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,030 Posts
Do not use carb cleaner or brake cleaner to try and clean it with.
They make a Mass Airflow Sensor Cleaner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,611 Posts
So then if we're traveling from home to some place like Arizona or the Alpine Loop...we should get fuel for the General at that altitude?

New motorhome doesn't have a toy tank. So probably going to invest in a Flo Fast set up with two 10.5 gallon tanks and probably a third tank.
So fill those with what octane unlimited? 85, 87, 91?

Any additive, like Seafoam? I do have that in all my gasoline storage cans. All seventeen of them...

Thanks for the education.

Forgot to post this reply last evening....

So...here's the location of the Mass Air Flow Sensor on a General

68529


You can get Mass Air Flow Sensor cleaner at about any auto parts store.

Pirate
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
So then if we're traveling from home to some place like Arizona or the Alpine Loop...we should get fuel for the General at that altitude?

New motorhome doesn't have a toy tank. So probably going to invest in a Flo Fast set up with two 10.5 gallon tanks and probably a third tank.
So fill those with what octane unlimited? 85, 87, 91?

Any additive, like Seafoam? I do have that in all my gasoline storage cans. All seventeen of them...

Thanks for the education.

Forgot to post this reply last evening....

So...here's the location of the Mass Air Flow Sensor on a General

View attachment 68529

You can get Mass Air Flow Sensor cleaner at about any auto parts store.

Pirate
Yes Pirate, gasoline blends are both seasonal and geographic. Altitude and temperature play the biggest part in that blend. It's a good practice to get and use your fuel in the area your going to ride in. If you have a vehicle back home that has a big V8, you can always put any left over gas in there, probably won't be that picky on what it likes. Plus with a big enough take, it will dilute at a few gallons at a time. Seems like single cylinder and twins are the most picky. I have a 2000 dodge ram 5.9magnum that will eat anything, so it gets left over and old fuel and never complains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,611 Posts
Corbo1962,
Here is information I got from Terry Gilomen regarding fuel for my General. Someone responded that I was full of it.
So asking your thoughts on the article.
68531


Thanks,

Pirate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Yes Pirate, gasoline blends are both seasonal and geographic. Altitude and temperature play the biggest part in that blend. It's a good practice to get and use your fuel in the area your going to ride in. If you have a vehicle back home that has a big V8, you can always put any left over gas in there, probably won't be that picky on what it likes. Plus with a big enough take, it will dilute at a few gallons at a time. Seems like single cylinder and twins are the most picky. I have a 2000 dodge ram 5.9magnum that will eat anything, so it gets left over and old fuel and never complains.
Cant see it being a major difference, buy premium here at home, elevation of 2000', put it in my sled which is a much higher performance motor ( 170hp 2 stroke 800) and pack jerry cans full for the trip to the mountains over 500 miles away in a different privince, ride at 7-9000' while there, no issues. I know they have different fuel blends for seasons but ive never heard of different blends for elevation, worked at gas plants and refineries, also have oil and gas college education and we never once learned about elevation differences in blends of fuel. Only for different climates or season changes, essentially the same thing.

Sent from my SM-G975W using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top