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I changed my spark plugs today. The general had an mr7f plug and I put in ngk cr9eix iridium plugs. They fit and work just fine if anyone is interested. Ngk part number 3521
 

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Nor sure why you would change the plugs and not put the ones that Polaris calls for. The plugs you put in are hotter then the ones you removed and I would be a little worried about running a hotter plug. I'm sure there is a reason that they want you to run the MR7F plug. Just my two cents worth. I would never run hotter plugs and be a little worried about burning the top of the pistons,
 

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well to be honest they both are the same heat range and the mr7f is the Polaris standard plug made by NGK. NGK# is CPR8E same plug . The cr9eix is the same plug just the Iridium plug a better longer lasting plug!
 

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How many miles did you have on your general or why did you think you had to change your plug's?
 

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It had 7600 miles but they looked plumb fine still. In the last year or so when I start it cold the idle jumps from 1250-1500 and if you try to move it before it completely warms up it will die when coming back to an idle and you have to hold the gas pedal to the floor to get it to start again. It’s flooding out I think because you have to hold the gas pedal down when it quits or it won’t start and every so often it will backfire when cranking after it quits.
 

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It had 7600 miles but they looked plumb fine still. In the last year or so when I start it cold the idle jumps from 1250-1500 and if you try to move it before it completely warms up it will die when coming back to an idle and you have to hold the gas pedal to the floor to get it to start again. It’s flooding out I think because you have to hold the gas pedal down when it quits or it won’t start and every so often it will backfire when cranking after it quits.
Did this problem go away after the change out or are you still having same issue?
 

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I sold my general but changing the plugs never changed anything. I think my clutches were slightly engaged or trying to engage and putting a pull on the engine was my problem.
 

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well to be honest they both are the same heat range and the mr7f is the Polaris standard plug made by NGK. NGK# is CPR8E same plug . The cr9eix is the same plug just the Iridium plug a better longer lasting plug!
I apologize for bringing up an old thread, but this information is incorrect. All three of the part numbers are a different temperature range, NGK being a colder plug with the higher number. Side note that iridium odd not always the better plug as a standard “copper” plug can provide a better burn in many applications. Yes iridium provides longer life. I hope this is not coming across rude. I just want to be helpful.
 

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Can one of you tell me which NGK Iridium plugs go in a General engine? I used them in the 800 was given a set to use in the General, a different number (Their down in the shop in cabinet and I don't remember).

But would like to move to them. They made a difference in the 800.

Thanks,
Pirate
 

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Can one of you tell me which NGK Iridium plugs go in a General engine? I used them in the 800 was given a set to use in the General, a different number (Their down in the shop in cabinet and I don't remember).

But would like to move to them. They made a difference in the 800.

Thanks,
Pirate
CR8EIX or the CR9EIX Temp range is only difference. 9 a little cooler range. Range is usually 1-10. Smaller engines usually take a hotter burning plug. The higher performance, hotter running engines take a cooler plug.

65900
 
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Can one of you tell me which NGK Iridium plugs go in a General engine? I used them in the 800 was given a set to use in the General, a different number (Their down in the shop in cabinet and I don't remember).

But would like to move to them. They made a difference in the 800.

Thanks,
Pirate
I would suggest a google search due to the amount of misinformation. I have been selling automotive and small engine parts for over 20 years for what it is worth. If the plug is to cool it build up carbon due to not burning off. If it is too hot of a plug you could have preignition. If the engine has not been modified or operated in extreme conditions I would strongly suggest staying with the OEM temperature range. Our machines typically operate from 200-208. This is not excessive. My Jeep operates around 210 as an example. As far as performance copper is the winner due to superior conductivity. Iridium is designed for longer life.
 

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Ckrebello,

I've used Google a couple of times in this search and came up empty handed every time. Walking down to the shop and gathering things up.

I have a pair of NGK V-POWER BKR7E plugs. I believe these are the plugs that come in the General motor

A pair of NGK
Iridium IX BKR8EIX plugs. I believe these are the plugs I was using in the RZR 800 with the Holz Racing Stage 3 package.

And a pair of NGK
Iridium IX CR9EIX plugs. These are the plugs I was given and was told these are the plugs to use in the General.

Any help on which ones?

Thanks,
Pirate
 

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Ckrebello,

I've used Google a couple of times in this search and came up empty handed every time. Walking down to the shop and gathering things up.

I have a pair of NGK V-POWER BKR7E plugs. I believe these are the plugs that come in the General motor

A pair of NGK
Iridium IX BKR8EIX plugs. I believe these are the plugs I was using in the RZR 800 with the Holz Racing Stage 3 package.

And a pair of NGK
Iridium IX CR9EIX plugs. These are the plugs I was given and was told these are the plugs to use in the General.

Any help on which ones?

Thanks,
Pirate
I too would use the 8 on a stage 3 RZR.
In a stock (or close to stock) general I would stay with the 7.
The 9 is a bit too cooL.
The factors for going with a cooler plug are mods that push the motor, hard driving, and extreme climate (high ambient temperature)
Additionally my preference is the standard “copper” plug.
 

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I too would use the 8 on a stage 3 RZR.
In a stock (or close to stock) general I would stay with the 7.
The 9 is a bit too cooL.
The factors for going with a cooler plug are mods that push the motor, hard driving, and extreme climate (high ambient temperature)
Additionally my preference is the standard “copper” plug.
Why copper over iridium? Just want to hear your opinion.
 

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Good question. In certain circumstances I have used stranded silver wire to get a better avenue for current to travel.

Pirate
 

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So a quick google search and found this:

Platinum and Iridium plugs perform at a lower level than copper spark plugs, because they are less conductive and they tend to overheat. However, the overall longevity of these two types of metal is better than copper plugs. In reality, copper has the best performance of all three and the worst longevity.

And that's what Crkebello has been telling us...Guess I'll stay with the NGK copper plugs...the BRK7E.

Now what do I do with the Iridium plugs?

Pirate
 

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From Champion's website. They burn hotter than copper. Reducing fouling. So, it stands to reason an 8 or 9 platinum or iridium may have the same carbon eliminating characteristics of a 7 in copper.

"Platinum is much harder metal than nickel alloy and has a higher melting point. Since platinum is harder, it holds its sharp edge much longer than a conventional spark plug, up to 100,000 miles. Longevity is a key advantage of platinum spark plugs.

Another advantage of platinum spark plugs is that they run a little hotter, which burns deposits off the spark plug better and helps prevent fouling. Platinum also handles high heat, enabling the spark plug to wear better.

Platinum spark plugs come in two varieties - single and double platinum. A single platinum plug is much like a copper spark plug with a platinum disc welded to the center electrode; a double platinum spark plug has a platinum disc on both the center and side electrodes.

Iridium is said to be six times harder and eight times stronger than platinum with a 700° higher melting point. Iridium spark plugs have extremely fine electrodes while retaining excellent wear characteristics. Thanks to its strength, iridium spark plugs can last up to 25% longer than comparable platinum spark plugs.

Iridium spark plugs feature a fine wire center electrode that is designed to conduct electrical energy better and increase firing efficiency.

There is a price for this precious metal. Iridium spark plugs are typically the most expensive, ranging from $8 to $15 each."
 
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