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What would prevent them from spinning independently? Guess I need to try a sharpie for myself and see.
Some might spin idk ...mine do not. I still have the same clutch noises and same performance. It's not like the distance the clutch moves is very far anyway probably less than or right around an inch.
 

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If you install them on an already damaged clutch, they may have a hard time spinning. You bring up a good point though. I’m going to look into it. Mine only had 300 miles on it when I put them in. There was negligible but apparent wear.
 

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I guess it really depends on how mush dust is in your area. I blow my clutches out every 40-100miles and always get a good amount that blows out. I also started squirting some aerosol graphite spray in the rollers everytime I blow the clutches out. Pirate talked about the graphite a few weeks back and how the rollers stop rolling because they lock up due to dryness. When I checked mine, sure enough one rolled fine but the other was locked up. After the graphite was sprayed on there it was fine. So when the roller is supposed to roll, it should have enough tension against the side it needs to roll on to roll. if it does turn due to being locked up, then its not going to roll.
 

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I guess it really depends on how mush dust is in your area. I blow my clutches out every 40-100miles and always get a good amount that blows out. I also started squirting some aerosol graphite spray in the rollers everytime I blow the clutches out. Pirate talked about the graphite a few weeks back and how the rollers stop rolling because they lock up due to dryness. When I checked mine, sure enough one rolled fine but the other was locked up. After the graphite was sprayed on there it was fine. So when the roller is supposed to roll, it should have enough tension against the side it needs to roll on to roll. if it does turn due to being locked up, then its not going to roll.
If there is no slop in the groove and it's touching on both sides at 3 o'clock and at 9 o'clock I don't care what you spray on it..it's not going to roll
 

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If there is no slop in the groove and it's touching on both sides at 3 o'clock and at 9 o'clock I don't care what you spray on it..it's not going to roll
I would agree with that. Quality control on these things leaves a lot to be desired. Mine weren't that tight. With that being said, I would try to turn the diameter of the roller down so it had the clearance to be able to spin. Maybe that will help....
 

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If there is no slop in the groove and it's touching on both sides at 3 o'clock and at 9 o'clock I don't care what you spray on it..it's not going to roll
I also want to clarify, I don't spray the graphite on the roller its self, I spray it down on the pin to get it into bearing area of the roller, not that there is a bearing there.
 
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I assume that belt slap is a very obvious sound. I hear a lot about that on here. Mine is new though so maybe it will do it later.
My General had horrible belt slap within 10 hours of taking delivery The Hunter belt is magical. It also dramatically improved my take offs by eliminating slippage.
 

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The problem is that when a wheel (the roller in this case) rolls in a slot, one side of the wheel needs to roll in one direction, but the other side has to roll in the opposite direction. Therefore, they cancel each other out. Here is a little sketch I made to illustrate the point:

66325
 

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Understood and agreed, the problem is there should be a gap and the roller should not be touching both sides at the same time. On mine, there is a gap and the rollers can roll.
 
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Understood and agreed, the problem is there should be a gap and the roller should not be touching both sides at the same time. On mine, there is a gap and the rollers can roll.
My suspicion is that even with a gap, I reckon that the roller wobbles back and forth across the slot, so the roller may turn a bit clockwise, only to bounce back counterclockwise, etc. I know for sure that MakersMarty12's observations match the flat spots I had on my rollers; the flat spots were about 1/8" to 3/16" long, even on both sides of both rollers. That was after about 3200 miles, yet there is no wear on the sides of the slot that you can see or feel. I wonder if the reason people get so much wear on the sides of the slot when running the square pucks is because they don't blow the dust out very often. Check my reasoning, but if the dust is allowed to stay in the clutch, it sticks really well to plastic, such as the square puck, and the puck then becomes a sanding block. The square puck has a lot more contact area with the sides of the slot than does a round roller, so it puts more grit against the aluminum alloy all of the time compared with the round roller. Bottom line: no matter if you run a square puck or round roller, you need to blow the dust out of the clutches often. "Often" will clearly depend on where you live and ride. Here in the southwest, it is sometimes every ride (but we generally ride about 100 miles each day).
 

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My suspicion is that even with a gap, I reckon that the roller wobbles back and forth across the slot, so the roller may turn a bit clockwise, only to bounce back counterclockwise, etc. I know for sure that MakersMarty12's observations match the flat spots I had on my rollers; the flat spots were about 1/8" to 3/16" long, even on both sides of both rollers. That was after about 3200 miles, yet there is no wear on the sides of the slot that you can see or feel. I wonder if the reason people get so much wear on the sides of the slot when running the square pucks is because they don't blow the dust out very often. Check my reasoning, but if the dust is allowed to stay in the clutch, it sticks really well to plastic, such as the square puck, and the puck then becomes a sanding block. The square puck has a lot more contact area with the sides of the slot than does a round roller, so it puts more grit against the aluminum alloy all of the time compared with the round roller. Bottom line: no matter if you run a square puck or round roller, you need to blow the dust out of the clutches often. "Often" will clearly depend on where you live and ride. Here in the southwest, it is sometimes every ride (but we generally ride about 100 miles each day).
I went to the rollers at 88miles and was already showing damage from the square pucks. Since I installed the rollers, I have had no marks or wear. I also blow the dust out every ride. I agree completely, our southwest throws plenty of dry dirt at these machines. I attached a pic that I took when I installed the rollers. I was able to buff it out with scotch bright and it pretty much disappeared,
So here is what I was trying to say earlier. I found that one of my rollers, stopped rolling and yes if this were to be allowed to continue, it would get flat spots. That is where the graphite spray comes in. Each time I blow the clutches out, I spray some graphite down in between the pin and the rollers and make sure it is free. Twice now, I have found that the roller was bound up with dirt and not rolling. The graphite works, you just have to be careful not to spray it everywhere.
I agree the pucks will pick up dirt and act as a grind stone on the clutch, but it doesn't take that long for it to happen. Maybe if you live in a dust free environment, its not that big of deal. But where we live, things will get eaten up fast. So to each his own, these rollers are working great in my clutch and I am pleased with their performance.
 

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