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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a question about relays I never use them when wiring on my general, most of what I do is just led lighting so very little current. I use the buss bar and wire from there but do hear you guys talking about relays. Can someone look at this link below and maybe give me a explanation of why and where I should be using relays. I do realize that if you have a big current draw relays are suppose to be used. But just never used them and am not really up on them Thanks.
PS are these the type of relay I would use if one were needed??

 

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Relays are used to keep high current draw items outside of the cab. In automotive applications you wouldn't want a high current draw device burning out the switch and potentially starting a fire. With modern LED lighting and the fact most switches are 20 amp rated, they aren't as essential. I used relays in my 18 G2, but I installed an actual fuse/relay box under the hood to keep everything neat and tidy. On my 20G4XP I'm using an Auxbeam controller instead. They really clean up the installation and make it very easy.
 

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For the small price of a relay and a little extra wiring it's always given me peace of mine knowing the relay will give way first before a fire starts hopefully. If you're starting from scratch, as Buelligan666 said, the Auxbeam is the way to go. I really enjoy doing wiring so I've never minded adding a relay and making everything neat and tidy.
 

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so are the relays in my post the ones I could use? Thanks for the replys
You can use those. They look like they follow the standard set by Bosch many years ago and are standard in most automobiles. They are the original size. This relay also come in a smaller size, which Polaris uses in the General. These relays come in 5 and 4 pin versions and both fit the same socket. The 5 pin version adds a normally closed (NC) contact which is not necessary for controlling accessories. Most people take the switched accessory wire to trigger the relay from the switch in the cab and add a fuse to the 40amp hot wire to be switched by the relay to the power the accessory.
 

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2016 Polaris General Deluxe, 10% OEM
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A lot is also a function of where you are getting the power for your accessories. The Polaris "accessory circuit" and fuse are rated at 10A.
Many have tried to power all sorts of accessories on that circuit only to find out the fuse and wire gauge won't handle the load.
So one uses the Polaris accessory circuit to trigger a relay and bring power from the battery or Pulse Bar if your machine has one.
Pirate
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A lot is also a function of where you are getting the power for your accessories. The Polaris "accessory circuit" and fuse are rated at 10A.































Many have tried to power all sorts of accessories on that circuit only to find out the fuse and wire gauge won't handle the load.































So one uses the Polaris accessory circuit to trigger a relay and bring power from the battery or Pulse Bar if your machine has one.















Pirat































Maybe


A lot is also a function of where you are getting the power for your accessories. The Polaris "accessory circuit" and fuse are rated at 10A.



Many have tried to power all sorts of accessories on that circuit only to find out the fuse and wire gauge won't handle the load.



So one uses the Polaris accessory circuit to trigger a relay and bring Maybe I shouldpower from the battery or Pulse Bar if your machine has one.



Pirate
A lot is also a function of where you are getting the power for your accessories. The Polaris "accessory circuit" and fuse are rated at 10A.

Many have tried to power all sorts of accessories on that circuit only to find out the fuse and wire gauge won't handle the load.

So one uses the Polaris accessory circuit to trigger a relay and bring power from the battery or Pulse Bar if your machine has one.

Pirate
Maybe I should move my wiper and stereo out of the Polaris bus bar and through a relay what do you think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So please correct me if I am wrong. If I use a 40A relay powered from the positive from the bus bar take the keyed wire to the relay to trigger the relay, another to ground on the relay and the output to the switch for my accessory I should be fine correct. That would take some of the load of the 10amp side of the bus bar which is almost Maxed out now.
 

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So please correct me if I am wrong. If I use a 40A relay powered from the positive from the bus bar take the keyed wire to the relay to trigger the relay, another to ground on the relay and the output to the switch for my accessory I should be fine correct. That would take some of the load of the 10amp side of the bus bar which is almost Maxed out now.
That sounds about right.

Another option: You can take the Keyed wire to the switch and back to the relay and just trigger the relay to turn your light on. So, 12v hot to relay, relay output to load (light), Keyed 12v to switch, switch to relay coil (trigger). Ground to relay coil (trigger). Then you only need small wire to the switch and all the heavier wire stays under the hood.
 

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It would be nice to know for sure the always hot out of the bus bar is not a very heavy wire for 40 amps.Can anybody confirm this.
The pulse bar plugs are available in different wire sizes (AWG). I bought a pack of 6 that are 12AWG. You may have 14 AWG or 16 AWG depending where you bought them. You're not supposed to pull the full 40amps from one pulse plug. You should use one for each load you're running. Then the wire size is less of an issue.
 
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