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Premium Member
2016 Polaris General Deluxe, 10% OEM
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5,022 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Stopping the brake pad rattle. I responded to a post or wrote a post on using Hillman Springs to stop the rattle. I believe certain Polaris Rangers have used these. Pullerguy brought them to the RZR 800 world. And I’ve written a much better post on how you can put them on your General. You may not have the “brake pad rattle” but put them on just to make sure. That’s what I did.

To start with, what springs? Well, these Hillman springs. I get them at my local Ace Hardware. But find that the local True Value Hardware also carries Hillman hardware.

The spring goes between the brake pads on each of the rear brake calipers and go over the “Caliper Mount Pins” that hold the brake pads in place.

The difficulty installing the springs is that they are pretty strong and if they expand at the wrong moment, the spring wire will get under the outer pad before it is fully installed. Once the spring wire gets between the Caliper Mount Pin and the inside of the square hole in the brake pad that goes over the Caliper Mount Pin. There is no getting it out without removing the outer brake pad.

So, let me explain how I install the Hillman springs starting with a caliper that has been unbolted from the Bearing Carrier and the old brake pads removed. There is no need to replace the brake pads if they are in good condition. But I did in this example due to an axle break and loss of the outer brake pad.

First thing it to compress the caliper pistons back into the caliper housing.
As you can see in the pic below, I use a pair of 10” Channel Lock pliers. On jaw on the back of the caliper housing and the other jaw on one of the pistons. Simply squeeze the pliers and the piston will move as far a possible back into the caliper housing. Do both pistons the same way.

In this next pic you can see the caliper with both pistons as far back in the caliper housing as they will go.

At this point, take a minute to clean the caliper. As you can sorta see in the pic below I use the fiber brush from a Harbor Freight Tools brush set. Use it to clean all the caliper surfaces as well as the inside of the pistons. You will be amazed at the dried mud and debris in there!

Now its time to install the inner brake pad. My experience over the years, with Polaris calipers, is that the brake pad can be slipped over a Caliper Mount Pin at one end, fairly easily. Find that Caliper Mount Pin and slip the brake pad over it.

The other Caliper Mount Pin, I have found, must be squeezed back into the caliper housing to get the brake pad over the pin. I do it as you can see below with a pair of pliers. In this situation, the jaws of the 10” Channel Lock pliers don’t quite get the job done. So, I use a pair of Irwin 12” adjustable pliers as shown in the next pic.

As you can see in the pic above, there is now plenty of room to be able to slip the brake pad over the Caliper Mount Pin. To be honest, I can’t tell you, but I think, there is brake fluid, and thus fluid pressure creating a force acting on the Caliper Mount that that moves it with the caliper pistons and the brake pads to keep everything aligned as the pads grasp the rotor and create braking.

At this point, you should have the caliper pistons all the way back into the caliper housing, one Caliper Mount Pin compressed back into the Caliper Housing and the inner brake pad in place over the two pins.

In my experiences, I have found that I can use the pliers on one end of the Caliper Mount and move the pin back into the Caliper Housing. Usually it’s the opposite end of the caliper from the end I can get the inner brake pad over the pin.

Sooo…now slip one of the Hillman Springs over the pin and use your fingers to compress the spring as shown in the pic below:

With the Hillman Spring compressed, use your other hand to slip the outer brake pad over the pin with the Hillman Spring on it. Like this:

If holding the Hillman Spring compressed with a fingernail, and slipping the outer brake pad over the pin wasn’t enough…now use a clamp to cover the end of the pin and the back of the Caliper Housing together so the Hillman Spring can’t get between the pin and inside of the hole in the brake pad. I have not had luck using a “squeeze clamp” in this situation. One with a screw, as shown is the pic below work. It’s a Harbor Freight Tools 6” steel clamp. About $5

With the clamp in place, place the second Hillman Spring over the other pin, compress the Hillman Spring as on the other pin, slip the brake pad over the pin. Press this end of the outer brake pad towards the inner brake pad, compressing the spring, and release the clamp.

The two Hillman Springs are now holding the brake pads apart at the pins.

Use a screwdriver to pry the brake pads apart, then slip the caliper into place over the rotor.

Install the two 10mm brake caliper bolts, torque, and you’re done.

No more brake pad rattle.

Total cost, about $10 if you need to buy a clamp.

Hope this is helpful. Here’s a link to this Word document in my Dropbox account if you want to copy it to your PC for future reference!

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/dz568k7ma7a51nj/AACmo2WEd2t-274NKhohT-r5a?dl=0

Pirate
 

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Premium Member
2016 Polaris General Deluxe, 10% OEM
Joined
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5,022 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cool Cheeto,

Last time my friend Pullerguy checked the Hillman Springs were a lot less expensive than the Polaris springs...but that's normal.

Have to check what the Polaris PN is...

Pirate
 

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Registered
2021 General XP1000 Deluxe w/RideCommand
Joined
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35 Posts
Stopping the brake pad rattle. I responded to a post or wrote a post on using Hillman Springs to stop the rattle. I believe certain Polaris Rangers have used these. Pullerguy brought them to the RZR 800 world. And I’ve written a much better post on how you can put them on your General. You may not have the “brake pad rattle” but put them on just to make sure. That’s what I did.

To start with, what springs? Well, these Hillman springs. I get them at my local Ace Hardware. But find that the local True Value Hardware also carries Hillman hardware.

The spring goes between the brake pads on each of the rear brake calipers and go over the “Caliper Mount Pins” that hold the brake pads in place.

The difficulty installing the springs is that they are pretty strong and if they expand at the wrong moment, the spring wire will get under the outer pad before it is fully installed. Once the spring wire gets between the Caliper Mount Pin and the inside of the square hole in the brake pad that goes over the Caliper Mount Pin. There is no getting it out without removing the outer brake pad.

So, let me explain how I install the Hillman springs starting with a caliper that has been unbolted from the Bearing Carrier and the old brake pads removed. There is no need to replace the brake pads if they are in good condition. But I did in this example due to an axle break and loss of the outer brake pad.

First thing it to compress the caliper pistons back into the caliper housing.
As you can see in the pic below, I use a pair of 10” Channel Lock pliers. On jaw on the back of the caliper housing and the other jaw on one of the pistons. Simply squeeze the pliers and the piston will move as far a possible back into the caliper housing. Do both pistons the same way.

In this next pic you can see the caliper with both pistons as far back in the caliper housing as they will go.

At this point, take a minute to clean the caliper. As you can sorta see in the pic below I use the fiber brush from a Harbor Freight Tools brush set. Use it to clean all the caliper surfaces as well as the inside of the pistons. You will be amazed at the dried mud and debris in there!

Now its time to install the inner brake pad. My experience over the years, with Polaris calipers, is that the brake pad can be slipped over a Caliper Mount Pin at one end, fairly easily. Find that Caliper Mount Pin and slip the brake pad over it.

The other Caliper Mount Pin, I have found, must be squeezed back into the caliper housing to get the brake pad over the pin. I do it as you can see below with a pair of pliers. In this situation, the jaws of the 10” Channel Lock pliers don’t quite get the job done. So, I use a pair of Irwin 12” adjustable pliers as shown in the next pic.

As you can see in the pic above, there is now plenty of room to be able to slip the brake pad over the Caliper Mount Pin. To be honest, I can’t tell you, but I think, there is brake fluid, and thus fluid pressure creating a force acting on the Caliper Mount that that moves it with the caliper pistons and the brake pads to keep everything aligned as the pads grasp the rotor and create braking.

At this point, you should have the caliper pistons all the way back into the caliper housing, one Caliper Mount Pin compressed back into the Caliper Housing and the inner brake pad in place over the two pins.

In my experiences, I have found that I can use the pliers on one end of the Caliper Mount and move the pin back into the Caliper Housing. Usually it’s the opposite end of the caliper from the end I can get the inner brake pad over the pin.

Sooo…now slip one of the Hillman Springs over the pin and use your fingers to compress the spring as shown in the pic below:

With the Hillman Spring compressed, use your other hand to slip the outer brake pad over the pin with the Hillman Spring on it. Like this:

If holding the Hillman Spring compressed with a fingernail, and slipping the outer brake pad over the pin wasn’t enough…now use a clamp to cover the end of the pin and the back of the Caliper Housing together so the Hillman Spring can’t get between the pin and inside of the hole in the brake pad. I have not had luck using a “squeeze clamp” in this situation. One with a screw, as shown is the pic below work. It’s a Harbor Freight Tools 6” steel clamp. About $5

With the clamp in place, place the second Hillman Spring over the other pin, compress the Hillman Spring as on the other pin, slip the brake pad over the pin. Press this end of the outer brake pad towards the inner brake pad, compressing the spring, and release the clamp.

The two Hillman Springs are now holding the brake pads apart at the pins.

Use a screwdriver to pry the brake pads apart, then slip the caliper into place over the rotor.

Install the two 10mm brake caliper bolts, torque, and you’re done.

No more brake pad rattle.

Total cost, about $10 if you need to buy a clamp.

Hope this is helpful. Here’s a link to this Word document in my Dropbox account if you want to copy it to your PC for future reference!

Hillman Brake Springs

Pirate
 

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Premium Member
2016 Polaris General Deluxe, 10% OEM
Joined
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5,022 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, the long spring will be in coil bind before you can get things together.
No one in your area sells Hillman hardware?
Pirate
 

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Registered
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5,900 Posts
Probably best to look online and order from their being the past number is listed above in Post 9.
 
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