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How many of you blow the dust out of your primary and secondary clutches? In the southwest dust is in abundance and important to blow out on a regular basis. I did a video to demonstrate how fast it can become a problem.

 

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How many of you blow the dust out of your primary and secondary clutches? In the southwest dust is in abundance and important to blow out on a regular basis. I did a video to demonstrate how fast it can become a problem.

Good idea to blow them out every time you do a long dusty ride. I got tired of all the dust coming in on my new 2020 G4 XP 1000 and disconnected the side intake going into the secondary and installed a small K&N filter with sock and Outerwear filters on the front intakes. Running two checks of 50 miles each in very dusty conditions little or no dirt dust was seen. Did have some minor belt dust and that was it! Secondary intake filter and sock did its job. Removed it and blew it out. Lots of very fine dust collected in the filter pleats.
 

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Hmmm...I wouldn't take the Secondary Cooling Air Inlet hose off the CVT housing. Instead get one of the Frogzskin covers for the plastic grille behind the door. You can get one through DuraClutch for about $24 delivered (I just bought another one). It comes with tabs with adhesive on them so it sticks to the grille very nicely.

You will need to seal up the gaps, where you can see light, on the inside of fender well. I use aluminum tape.

You should also get a tube of 100% silicone sealant and some Mineral Spirits. Carefully squeeze the sealant into the gap between the fender and the grille, on the outside. Then dip your finger in the Mineral Spirits and smooth the silicone and use it to wipe off any excess or any on you're fingers...it works amazingly well!!

Got some pics of your K&N filter in place?

Just thoughts,

Pirate
 

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Pirate and some others wanted to see pictures of my CVT intake on my 2020 G4 XP deluxe. Let me begin by saying I don't have much good to say about the factory frog skin. Make some other suppliers may have a better product. We run in lot brush and often the frog skin gets torn off plus it doesn't do much for keeping the dust out of the 2nd nary clutch. On our Friday night run of approx 40 miles in very dusty conditions I pulled the CVT cover and the K&N filter. (see pictures) the clutch area had little or no dust. The K&N filter and with a sock on it revealed very fine dust that collected in the filter pleats. (The Run started with a clean filter) This is the kind of dust over time that will take a clutch out, especially the one or two way bearing in the primary clutch. The beauty of the 2020 XP fender flares shields the improvised K&N filter area quite well. If you care for the K&N filter as the instructions required as addressed in the cleaning kit, spray on cleaner, leave it set for 10 minutes then wash with water until no more evidence of dirt or cleaner are observed. When both outside and inside after the filter has been thoroughly dried, then apply the oil spray as needed. Leave it dry for at least 30 minutes and then install the filter. That way you get no oil migration into the CVT area. This improvisation has worked quite well for me and if anyone has a better way of keeping the clutch free of dust I open to what you have to say. :)

For those of you that have 2019 and back Generals unless you have fender flares like the 2020 XP Generals you will have to shield of the area in question if you decide to do what I have done for it is wide open on the earlier models.
 

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This also helps with moving air through the clutch housing to exhaust the accumulated dust out of the housing and also keeping the clutches and belt cooler to prolong their lifetime. Very easy installation.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I blow my clutches out at least every 300-400 miles, more often if it was a really dusty ride. Indeed, here in the southwest we have lots of very fine dust. I still prefer it to mud!
 

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We don’t have dust in Baja, we only have “dirt lite”
Some say it’s “less filling” others say it “taste great”
Hmmmm not sure about taste great one.
All good ideas posted here, I’ve got outerwears , frog skins and blow hole and they help a bunch but you still need to blow it out after every long trip

Cheers Baja Charlie
 

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We don’t have dust in Baja, we only have “dirt lite”
Some say it’s “less filling” others say it “taste great”
Hmmmm not sure about taste great one.
All good ideas posted here, I’ve got outerwears , frog skins and blow hole and they help a bunch but you still need to blow it out after every long trip

Cheers Baja Charlie
I think this is very good advice.
 

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Could someone please share some links to the intake frogskins and the one on the driver side. I looked on their web site did not see them.

Thanks Muz
 

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Ok friends, I have my prototype secondary clutch air intake built and ready for field trials. Here is what I did:

1. Using the OEM grille, I cut a piece of 1/8" steel plate, without the mounting tabs that are on the OEM grille. Also marked the plate for locations to drill mounting holes based on the grille.

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2. I used aluminum tape to seal the tab slots in the quarter panel. I sealed them on the outside and the inside (i.e., side towards the engine). The threads cut into the OEM intake neck (1-5/8" i.d.) are the result of my first prototype; I had threaded a 1-1/4" nipple (1-3/8" i.d.) through the neck, but then my air flow calculations made me uncomfortable because the additional reduction in inside diameter could result in about a 33% increase in air velocity, which would produce a reduction in air volume due to friction.

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3. Cut a 2-1/8" diameter hole in the new plate, and drilled two additional holes for stronger mounting to the quarter panel.

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4. Filet welded a 2" street elbow to the outside of the 1/8" plate. View from outside after grinding and sanding to make it look pretty and prep for painting.

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And the inside. Note that the 2-1/8" hole in the plate is not in direct line with the OEM intake hole in the quarter panel. This is to allow space for the fillet welds, and should have minimal adverse impact on air flow.

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5. Install self adhesive weatherstripping to the quarter panel to form a seal. The minor gaps at the corners will be eliminated when the plate is bolted on and the weatherstripping compressed.

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6. Install the plate with street elbow after painting and applying teflon tape to the male pipe threads. This is necessary to facilitate removal of the 2" ABS piping that will be threaded to the elbow (the ABS plastic tends to stick to the steel elbow without teflon tape or pipe dope).

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7. I made neoprene washers to seal the nut ends of the two additional bolts.

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Final photos in the next post!
 

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8. I used threaded fittings for the 2" ABS plastic components so that the assembly could be assembled and disassembled. I used single hole conduit brackets to secure the horizontal leg to the rear of the cab. One bracket is secured with one of the rear windshield mounting bolts, the other with a bolt in a newly drilled hole. The Outerwears prefilter is the prototype; ultimately I will install one 10" long so that I can drill multiple large holes in the terminal elbow to spread out the air flow and thereby increase the utilization of the prefilter. I put the intake near the center of the windshield after a discussion with my buddy Pirate, the concept being that the center of the rear windshield is furthest away from the dust stream off the front tires. The elbow faces down to reduce rain entering the intake, probably not needed since the Outerwears is waterproof, but why not?

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9. Here is the view along the side of the car. The new intake adds a bit to the width of the car, maybe 1". We need Randy at Grizzztek to build the plate from plastic with a reduced profile!

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This project would have been easier, but when I asked Ask Polaris about the air flow through the PVT, they told me that was proprietary information! If I owned some air flow measurement equipment, I would have known what I needed to know for the calculations. Field trials begin tomorrow; update report to follow!
 

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8. I used threaded fittings for the 2" ABS plastic components so that the assembly could be assembled and disassembled. I used single hole conduit brackets to secure the horizontal leg to the rear of the cab. One bracket is secured with one of the rear windshield mounting bolts, the other with a bolt in a newly drilled hole. The Outerwears prefilter is the prototype; ultimately I will install one 10" long so that I can drill multiple large holes in the terminal elbow to spread out the air flow and thereby increase the utilization of the prefilter. I put the intake near the center of the windshield after a discussion with my buddy Pirate, the concept being that the center of the rear windshield is furthest away from the dust stream off the front tires. The elbow faces down to reduce rain entering the intake, probably not needed since the Outerwears is waterproof, but why not?

View attachment 66336

9. Here is the view along the side of the car. The new intake adds a bit to the width of the car, maybe 1". We need Randy at Grizzztek to build the plate from plastic with a reduced profile!

View attachment 66337

This project would have been easier, but when I asked Ask Polaris about the air flow through the PVT, they told me that was proprietary information! If I owned some air flow measurement equipment, I would have known what I needed to know for the calculations. Field trials begin tomorrow; update report to follow!
Will be curious to see how yours works
 
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